Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening

Krishnamurti Quote of the Day

Commentaries on Living Series I | Chapter 45

We are the things we possess, we are that to which we are attached. Attachment has no nobility. Attachment to knowledge is not different from any other gratifying addiction. Attachment is self-absorption, whether at the lowest or at the highest level. Attachment is self-deception, it is an escape from the hollowness of the self. The things to which we are attached - property, people, ideas - become all-important, for without the many things which fill its emptiness, the self is not. The fear of not being makes for possession; and fear breeds illusion, the bondage to conclusions. Conclusions, material or ideational, prevent the fruition of intelligence, the freedom in which alone reality can come into being; and without this freedom, cunning is taken for intelligence. The ways of cunning are always complex and destructive. It is this self-protective cunning that makes for attachment; and when attachment causes pain, it is this same cunning that seeks detachment and finds pleasure in the pride and vanity of renunciation. The understanding of the ways of cunning, the ways of the self, is the beginning of intelligence.

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So, can you, while living, vigorous, active, end your attachment, end a particular habit voluntarily, easily, quietly?
Through attachment the inevitable darkness of fear is waiting
Can the mind live, be vital, energetic, full of depth, without attachment? Of course it can.
For the speaker attachment is much more important than detachment.
A mind that is indifferent, is aware of the shoddiness of our civilization, the shoddiness of our thought, the ugly relationships;
An intelligent mind acts in the field of thought intelligently, sanely, without resistance;
We have divided life into dying and living. And this division has brought about great fear. And out of that fear we invent all kinds of theories, very comforting, may be illusory, but it is very comforting, illusions are comfortably neurotic.
The mere pursuit of detachment does not reveal the shallowness of attachment, which can be understood only when the mind and heart are not escaping through the idea of detachment.
Being attached, you find pain and strife in attachment; and in order to overcome that pain and strife, you say 'I must be detached.'
In the very desire to achieve anything, there is the seed of its own opposite.
Surely, attachment is not the problem, is it?