Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
Awareness in our world today | moderated by Krishnan Srinivasan

Is vegetarianism a must for saving the world and ourselves?

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Sun, 06 Sep 2009 #31
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Patricia Hemingway wrote:
K spoke constantly of the deep sensitivity required for the human brain to understand its own disorder and to bring about change. He also said that, while vegetarianism and veganism will not on its own change the human brain, there CAN BE NO CHANGE while one is consuming animal flesh.

This is absurd Patricia and has absolutely no basis in fact. And if K did in fact say such a thing, surely it seems to have come home to roost in the end.

Interestingly, K was indeed very careful when it came to taking care of his body (that is according to his standards). Yet he died in an rather unpleasant and painful manner. One that required lots of morphine to ease his pain. I happen to know of people who have not been near so fastidious regarding taking care of their body and yet they lived long lives and often died very peacefully in their sleep. Personally I believe these kinds of people had a sensitive and well-constructed (genetically) organism and also lived a pretty decent moral life. Perhaps not a perfect one, but one good enough to please Natural Law.

K also once pondered on why people died in such wretched states of disrepair from all sorts of diseases. Yet something seemed to have gone wrong in his own life (in spite of his sensitivity) and came back to bite him, so to speak. Though he was honest enough to wonder if something he did was responsible for his cancer. I feel he became bitter, cold, and hard towards people and life as his life went on. Due primarily to him being caught in the trap of dependency on other people. And many of them undesirable (meaning untransformable) people. A certain Indian woman (whose name I don't recall) who was close to him stated in the film 'K: With a Quiet Mind' that she felt he began to lose the joy of living after the 50s. I agree.

My experience is that when some one who possesses a sensitive organism and is thereby is blessed with the gift of life and love, he must ongoingly and ever more perfectly and completely turn his life and his will over to the Greater Will (or continually die to the self in K's terms), or there could very likely be repercussions. And often more than just losing the joy of living.

Indeed, the 'Sacred', the 'Beloved', or the 'Other' are certainly not things to be taken lightly or toyed with. They demand perfect self-knowledge and obedience or else. At least this continues to be my own personal experience and observations of others.

The best health care is taking good care of your health, and especially one's moral and spiritual health.

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Sun, 06 Sep 2009.

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Sun, 06 Sep 2009 #32
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Krishnan Srinivasan wrote:
One cannot categorize vegetarianism as an "ism" and belief-system and try to dismiss it ,as you attempt at, dear GV Tongeren. We are pointing out the consequences of unmitigtaed violence inflicted upon fellow creatures on this Earth and the gross consumer nature. It is not an ism.It is an actual fact of what is obtaining todays world. One does not need to be an arrogant philosopher to be sensitive to ones own body and ones own envron. As the saying goes "it is Sofie`s choice.......

I find it's not so much what goes into a person's body Krishnan, but what comes out of it that really counts. One's words, thoughts, and deeds. One's attitude, actions, and behaviors, or the content of his character.

Of course if the seed of love is not firmly planted in him in the early years, then nothing much matters at all. He'll do little more than mischief-making all the rest of his days, and reap the rewards thereof. Which generally is to live little more than a life of quiet desperation.

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Sun, 06 Sep 2009.

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #33
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

Greg Van Tongeren wrote:
Isn't vegetarianism like every other "ism," a divisive philosophy as to what should be? Another belief-system as to what is moral and what is not?

Can a fact - an action - be an 'ism'?

This post was last updated by Patricia Hemingway Mon, 07 Sep 2009.

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #34
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
My experience is that when some one who possesses a sensitive organism and is thereby is blessed with the gift of life and love, he must ongoingly and ever more perfectly and completely turn his life and his will over to the Greater Will (or continually die to the self in K's terms), or there could very likely be repercussions. And often more than just losing the joy of living.

A 'sensitive organism' that consumes animal flesh? And all this talk of 'love'. Where is the 'love' for the suffering and tortured sentient beings, farmed to fulfill your desires?

This post was last updated by Patricia Hemingway Mon, 07 Sep 2009.

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #35
Thumb_february_26-_birthday_pics_and_ebay_001 Greg Van Tongeren United States 28 posts in this forum Offline

KS:
One cannot categorize vegetarianism as an "ism" and belief-system and try to dismiss it ,as you attempt at, dear GV Tongeren. We are pointing out the consequences of unmitigtaed violence inflicted upon fellow creatures on this Earth and the gross consumer nature. It is not an ism. It is an actual fact of what is obtaining today's world. One does not need to be an arrogant philosopher to be sensitive to ones own body and ones own envron. As the saying goes "it is Sofie`s choice.......

gv: an approach that speaks in terms of what should be is based upon belief. Where others disagree as to what should be, there is conflict. When people actually see and feel the truth or a matter, they act. They don't need to be persuaded or condemned or coerced. I recall that when asked about diet, Tolle suggested you listen to your body and let it tell you what best meets its particular needs. He does not say a certain diet is a moral imperative because that kind of "morality" is not arising from sensitivity.

If the reason we don't eat something is because we were taught it is very wrong, we may well get sick when we eat it, but that is a conditioned reaction. I recall Osho said that happened to him, his conditioning in that regard was so deep.

The benediction is where you are

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #36
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

Greg Van Tongeren wrote:
If the reason we don't eat something is because we were taught it is very wrong, we may well get sick when we eat it, but that is a conditioned reaction.

It is very easy to find out for oneself whether or not disease, aggression and flesh-eating go together. One only needs to take the action of cutting out all animal flesh from the diet - and observe what takes place.

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #37
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

Krishnan - It is interesting to look into the relationship between a vegetarian diet and the old caste system in India. I had a vague awareness of the importance of diet in that system, but have just been reading up on what a large part it played. In fact in many of the ancient cultures diet was an extremely important factor. In that respect, perhaps as far as diet is concerned anyway, humanity is less aware now than then.

If you think about it - mankind seems to 'consume' everything now. And what is your feeling about organ transplants? 'Cannibalism' by any other name surely?

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #38
Thumb_avatar david sharma Ireland 6 posts in this forum Offline

Like his ancestors man can eat raw veg, fruits, and sprouted seeds. Mother nature will bless him with viverent health; she may recover her self too.

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #39
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Patricia Hemingway wrote:
If you think about it - mankind seems to 'consume' everything now. And what is your feeling about organ transplants? 'Cannibalism' by any other name surely?

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #40
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Dear Patricia, your sensitivity is taking over here and I agree and appreciate it very much- it is a sort of cannibalism this organ transplant business. It all started with the South African Dr.Bernard and his monkey tricks.As one who studied Health Economics here in DK, I can tell you the transplanted personsQUALYS(i.e.Qulaity of life over the years) are very limited. It is an excellence on the part of medical/surgical personnel.This is the trend of"ACHIEVEMENT"/"BECOMING"in JK terminology.It is not only in transplants.Take the poor Indian Government spending on MOON missions,Chinese spending on moon activity, when their common populations starve and have no hygienic toilets, bathrooms, running water supply... I can go on . The general picture is one of aggression,Insensitivity, callousness and the elite few have hijacked the masses in many ways other than democratic.Every country has a collective image and each other compete and imitate that goes on even in scientific elite groups. In general, Common sense is lost sensitivity is not to be traced in all their activities. We need true brave Brahmins of the old times. JK told in Greece this story:
There was a Brahmin adviser to the Indian King who fought against the mighty Alexander the Great in Punjab. When the Indian king was defeated, Alexander though victorious ,was impressed by the organization of his enemy and asked the
vanquished King how he managed such huge organization that he found it difficult
to fight and confront. The king replied that he had an adviser, a Brahmin. Then Alexander wanted to employ him. When he approached, the Brahmin refused because he has just resigned his post with the King and he was committed to teach two young children in his village. However much the King & Alexander persuaded, he would not flinch and give up his commitment to teach the village children.Such sensitive and brave persons are rare to find in todays modern world. Anything can be cooked up bymoney&prestige&other means. cronies can be bought speech writers can be employed to delude the masses through multimedia.We are living in a chaotic insensitive world today.

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

This post was last updated by Krishnan Srinivasan Tue, 08 Sep 2009.

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #41
Thumb_february_26-_birthday_pics_and_ebay_001 Greg Van Tongeren United States 28 posts in this forum Offline

Pat--
It is very easy to find out for oneself whether or not disease, aggression and flesh-eating go together. One only needs to take the action of cutting out all animal flesh from the diet - and observe what takes place.

===

Aren't you minimizing the nature of deeply engrained habits? What takes place is that you suffer. You may think: "I should not eat this because it was once a living creature that was violently killed to satify man's appetite. I would not kill it myself so I shouldn't eat it just because someone else did it for me." But at the same time after a lifetime of eating and enjoying meat, you very much want to consume it and that is an undeniable fact. So there is a conflict between what is and what you think should be and generally the habituated reoccurring urge wins out.

That which we resist, persists. This is a problem not only with what we eat but with conditioned reactions and urges generally.

What is occurring inwardly when we lose sensitivity? Sensitivity is a quality of energetic presense, and that is our real treasure is it not? (I am asking myself) So I see how in doing violence outwardly, we are doing violence inwardly. I see how and why virtue is indeed its own reward.

The benediction is where you are

This post was last updated by Greg Van Tongeren Mon, 07 Sep 2009.

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Mon, 07 Sep 2009 #42
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

Greg Van Tongeren wrote:
But at the same time after a lifetime of eating and enjoying meat, you very much want to consume it and that is an undeniable fact. So there is a conflict between what is and what you think should be and generally the habituated reoccurring urge wins out.

Where did you draw that conclusion Greg? Or perhaps you speak of your own experience?

Unlike Krishnan, I am not a lifelong vegetarian. Over twenty-five years ago I had an insight into the danger of flesh-eating. Since then I have not touched meat, nor have I had any desire at all to do so. So one can only say - it must have been a genuine insight! :)

Greg Van Tongeren wrote:
Aren't you minimizing the nature of deeply engrained habits?

Exactly right! For humans, flesh-eating is a habit. The human body - with its long intestinal tract - is not designed for meat-eating. Humans are not flesh-eaters by nature, but rather by habit. Hence many human diseases.

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Tue, 08 Sep 2009 #43
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Patricia Hemingway wrote:
A 'sensitive organism' that consumes animal flesh? And all this talk of 'love'. Where is the 'love' for the suffering and tortured sentient beings, farmed to fulfill your desires?

Yes Patricia, in spite of eating meat, a great love and sensitivity not only lie deep within me, but they overflow in action, most often right-action. Quite frankly I feel that I have an even greater sensitivity than K had, along with deeper insights into the nature of the fallen condition of the human species. Though granted, that surely wasn't always the case. A sensitivity whose primary concern is learning how to fully love human beings. Not that I lack love, respect, and compassion for animals, no not at all, but as a man who feels he has his priorities right. It's been said long ago that man has dominion over the animals, which I agree. Although man collectively no longer has any real understanding of the true meaning of this anymore, so lost in the darkness of selfhood he is.

Personally, I feel, with perhaps some exceptions, that virtually anyone who owns a pet of any sort is essentially a cold, unthinking, uncaring, discompassionate person. Keeping an animal a prisoner for its entire life (and thereby not allowing it to be true to its own animal self-nature) for our own selfish purposes I find is far more cruel than swiftly killing it (which can be, though rarely ever is, done with love, compassion, and gratitude) and consuming it for one's nourishment or survival. Not to mention how we so often permanently mutilate ("torture") these animals in various ways, such as castration, spaying, de-clawing, bobbing their tails, cropping their ears, etc. in order that they better fit into our own petty self-centered or convenient scheme of things. Much like man everywhere tries to pull God down from His heavens and mold Him into his own image, rather than making the long, hard, and difficult climb to Him. However my keen observations make it clear to me that He (or Natural Law, if you prefer) always has the last laugh, the last say. Actually I'd say that perhaps it would be far more humane for most people to kill their dogs, cats, and other pets and eat them, than selfishly controlling, maiming, and exploiting them all the rest of their days. Including so-called "smothering them with love", which is not love at all. And then get on with their own personal journey of self-knowing. In the long run I think their karma would be far more pleasant.

I feel K stopped living his teachings and lost much of his sensitivity, compassion, and spirit as time when on, and became more and more machinelike and overly analytical in many of his talks and dialogues. Whereby the love and joy also slowly withered away from his life. It's happened to myself very often along the way. Yet it was always there to recapture again upon another total surrender and then obediently getting back again on the right track. Personally I continue to eat meat (though sparingly and certainly not thoughtlessly like most) and continue to experience a lot of genuine heartfelt love and joy in my life. Much like K surely had at one time in all their fullness and glory, yet wasn't able to hang on to. So my experience remains that "the possibility of joy everlasting", as is mentioned in today's Kinfonet quote of the day, exists for those whose innate sensitivity is calling them to total self-abandonment. That is if they let go absolutely and then completely give themselves to the process of the recultivation of that sensitivity along with sincere and conscientious character-building.

I think K, like many of his adherents, was far too squeamish so far as war, violence, suffering , killing, etc. goes. Whereas the fact of the matter is that there's a time and place for everything under the sun. And that all these things are simply necessary for the making and the perfecting of man.

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

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Tue, 08 Sep 2009 #44
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Patricia Hemingway wrote:
Exactly right! For humans, flesh-eating is a habit. The human body - with its long intestinal tract - is not designed for meat-eating. Humans are not flesh-eaters by nature, but rather by habit. Hence many human diseases.

Again, why then did K, the righteous vegetarian, suffer and die from cancer, Patricia? While there are meat eaters who die peacefully, and in reasonably good health, in their sleep at equally advanced ages.

Where did he go wrong, I wonder?

Bob M.

"Touch is a language that can communicate more love in five seconds than five minutes of carefully chosen words.....Children from homes with loving, touching parents look and act differently from those who are rarely touched. Touched children feel better about themselves and are less hostile, more out going. Well-touched children almost seem to glow." (Phyllis Davis - 'The Power of Touch')

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Tue, 08 Sep 2009.

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Tue, 08 Sep 2009 #45
Thumb_february_26-_birthday_pics_and_ebay_001 Greg Van Tongeren United States 28 posts in this forum Offline

Pat said: Unlike Krishnan, I am not a
lifelong vegetarian. Over twenty-five
years ago I had an insight into the
danger of flesh-eating. Since then I
have not touched meat, nor have I had
any desire at all to do so. So one can
only say - it must have been a genuine
insight! :)

Perhaps so. Or perhaps a new identity was established in belief as to what should or should not be eaten along with other associated beliefs. Indicators of that might be a judgmental attitude or self-rightious feelings of indignation.

The benediction is where you are

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Tue, 08 Sep 2009 #46
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

Greg Van Tongeren wrote:
Indicators of that might be a judgmental attitude or self-rightious feelings of indignation.

I suggest the "self-righteous feelings of indignation" come from the flesh-eaters. :)

This post was last updated by Patricia Hemingway Tue, 08 Sep 2009.

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Tue, 08 Sep 2009 #47
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
Again, why then did K, the righteous vegetarian, suffer and die from cancer, Patricia?

The body dies eventually. K was no more immune from death than anyone else. At least he did not contribute to animal suffering during his lifetime.

I am not in a position to judge the manner of K's death. You may believe you are - but be careful - meat-eating can lead to delusions of grandeur! :D

This post was last updated by Patricia Hemingway Tue, 08 Sep 2009.

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Tue, 08 Sep 2009 #48
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
Where did he go wrong, I wonder?

Why suggest death is 'wrong'? It is just an ending - no matter in what form it comes about.

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Tue, 08 Sep 2009 #49
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Canadian researchers in Vancouver Fisheries research Institute have developed salmon fish at their hatchery which would mature within one year instead of two years by genetic transplants.These genetically modified transgene fish are not yet let into the deep oceans.... there are fears of consequences as they would consume other small fish in huge quantities and at a faster rate to become fat&mature, again ready for consumotion by man. So there are endless efforts to satisfy the ever increasing appetite of the flesh-eaters of the world!

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Tue, 08 Sep 2009 #50
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Patricia Hemingway wrote:
Why suggest death is 'wrong'? It is just an ending - no matter in what form it comes about.

I've never said death was wrong, Patricia. I asked why K died of cancer since he was a vegetarian and extraordinarily careful as to taking care of his body; and other people who are not vegetarians often live as long as he did and die disease free and often easily, or perhaps even with a smile as he suggests below.

"Why do human beings die so miserably, so unhappily, with a disease, old age, senility, the body shrunk, ugly? Why can't they die naturally and as beautifully as this leaf? What is wrong with us? In spite of all the doctors, medicines, and hospitials, operations and all the agony of life, and the pleasures too, we don't seem able to die with dignity, simplicity, and with a smile." (J. K. - 'K to Himself')

So again I ask, what happened to K? Where did he go wrong?

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Wed, 09 Sep 2009.

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Tue, 08 Sep 2009 #51
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Patricia Hemingway wrote:
At least he (K) did not contribute to animal suffering during his lifetime.

I believe K wore leather shoes and perhaps other articles made of leather, Patricia.

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

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Wed, 09 Sep 2009 #52
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
Not that I lack love, respect, and compassion for animals, no not at all, but as a man who feels he has his priorities right. It's been said long ago that man has dominion over the animals, which I agree. Althou

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Wed, 09 Sep 2009 #53
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Dear Bob, you have clearly hit the point. That is the idea that man has been sanctioned" dominion" over the animal kingdom is the root of all evil ( committed against the animals.) It originates from the christianity that "so-called-Saint" Pauls`s interpretation and propagation of the original BIBLE! Nowadays the terrorist-muslims, kill people, saying it is sanctioned by their bible Quran ,to kill the infidels(non-believers)
So, in between these two major religions, who kill by the name of their holy books, where can mankind go...?Animals? No way of saving them... The barbarians are marching....

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Wed, 09 Sep 2009 #54
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Krishnan Srinivasan wrote:
Dear Bob, you have clearly hit the point. That is the idea that man has been sanctioned" dominion" over the animal kingdom is the root of all evil ( committed against the animals.) It originates from the christianity that "so-called-Saint" Pauls`s interpretation and propagation of the original BIBLE! Nowadays the terrorist-muslims, kill people, saying it is sanctioned by their bible Quran ,to kill the infidels(non-believers) So, in between these two major religions, who kill by the name of their holy books, where can mankind go...?Animals? No way of saving them... The barbarians are marching....

Dear Krishnan,

I think there's clearly a misunderstanding here on your part Krishnan. And I have no need to go any futher into trying to rectify the matter. My goal is to point out the facts and let them fly wherever they may. And not to enter into or waste precious time in foolish and spiritually non-productive controversy and argument. Which are amost always bound up in little more than a need for self or ego assertion.

Love and truth and how to attain to such things is what our world needs (as per Krishnamurti too), and that is my priority.

And by the way I enjoyed a hotdog for lunch yesterday. Though they are not my favorite meat source, as one never knows what sort of junk they may contain. And I didn't eat it because the Bible tells me it's permissible. Rather, I think, choose, decide, and discover things for myself.

One may point his finger at the Christians and the Muslims and the 'barbarians' all he wants, but soon I'm afraid there's going to be a lot of killing going on, Krishnan (the necessary grand-cleansing of the planet). So be prepared, be ready. I might even suggest that you repent ! Or perhaps start pointing the finger at oneself.

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Wed, 09 Sep 2009.

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Wed, 09 Sep 2009 #55
Thumb_original_avatar max greene United States 23 posts in this forum Offline

Krishnan,

There are many reasons why meat eating is undesirable. Here are a few:


  1. It's an uneconomical use of productive land.


  2. It's a cruelty to living things.


  3. It's dirty and messy in the raising and slaughtering.


  4. It's use tends to coarsen one.


  5. It's not necessary in view of today's nutritional knowledge.


max

This post was last updated by max greene Wed, 09 Sep 2009.

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Thu, 10 Sep 2009 #56
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
but soon I'm afraid there's going to be a lot of killing going on, Krishnan (the necessary grand-cleansing of the planet). So be prepared, be ready. I might even suggest that you repent ! Or perhaps start pointing the finger at oneself.

K said that mankind created god in man's image, then asked god to explain the universe and this sent man mad. What a vengeful 'now-I-am-going-to be-proved-right-when-you-are-all-dead-because-you-didn't-listen-to-me' god is created in Bob M's image here. :D

Really Bob - one cannot even begin to approach the teaching of K until all vestige of such petty-minded judeo-christian conditioning is seen, understood and ended. No wonder you dismiss the later teaching, where K had finally closed all loop-holes for those who would still seek self-gratifying solace in what he said.

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Thu, 10 Sep 2009 #57
Thumb_february_26-_birthday_pics_and_ebay_001 Greg Van Tongeren United States 28 posts in this forum Offline

Pat:
I suggest the "self-righteous feelings of indignation" come from the flesh-eaters. :)

That implies inward division, i.e. between the
meat-eaters and the vegetarians; us and them.

The benediction is where you are

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Thu, 10 Sep 2009 #58
Thumb_patricia_may_2014_reduced_ Patricia Hemingway Australia 23 posts in this forum Offline

The division between meat-eaters and vegetarians is not 'inward division'. It is a physical fact. We are what we eat - no?

K had many people around him, but all indications are that, at least when they were in his vicinity, they behaved as vegetarians. I wonder - would he have interacted closely with them if he was aware they were flesh-eaters?

Personally - it is not my business what other people choose to consume. But my own observation is that it makes a tremendous difference to flexibility of thought and sensitivity of feeling. And (technical) flexibility is essential to understanding the whole movement of thought.

So I have not made a doctrine about division. There IS one human brain on the planet - a disordered brain. At the root of much of that disorder is meat-eating - a residue of universal cannibalism - the wrong turn. As far as I am concerned - the first step to ending the disorder is to end flesh consumption. You can agree with me or not. It makes no difference. The truth does not depend upon opinion - neither yours NOR mine - it is there regardless.

This post was last updated by Patricia Hemingway Thu, 10 Sep 2009.

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Thu, 10 Sep 2009 #59
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

max greene wrote:
Krishnan,
There are many reasons why meat eating is undesirable. Here are a few:
It's an uneconomical use of productive land.
It's a cruelty to living things.
It's dirty and messy in the raising and slaughtering.
It's use tends to coarsen one.
It's not necessary in view of today's nutritional knowledge.
max

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Thu, 10 Sep 2009 #60
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Thanks Max.

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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