Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
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Closer than any word


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Sat, 21 Sep 2019 #1
Thumb_open-uri20180717-8420-135f99u-0 Mina Martini Finland 265 posts in this forum Offline

The perception of your true nature, is closer to you than any word,
any image. Therefore no written word, no book, no religion, no ideology, no philosophy, is able to bring about that total perception of yourself, which is what you already are.

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Sat, 21 Sep 2019 #2
Thumb_dm Dan McDermott United States 1513 posts in this forum Offline

Mina Martini wrote:
The perception of your true nature, is closer to you than any word,
any image.

It is what 'sees', isn't it? It occurred to me on reading your post that this 'self' or 'ego' or 'me' is loneliness itself. It doesn't 'get' or 'become' lonely, it is loneliness. The loneliness that was/is inevitable when we somehow 'think' and feel that we are essentially separate from everything and everyone else...Each thought is born and then dies...that is the fact. But thought has sought to overcome that by creating a 'thinker' separate, that has a kind of permanency or continuity. The 'problem' with that is that this thinker (and the 'new' brain) unlike all the rest of animal nature knows that it is going one day to die, to end. And that is unpalatable even scary to the 'old'
brain...that this unique 'me' will one day disappear...So the loneliness, suffering, anxiety about the future is 'built in' (is?) the thinker, isn't it? But try as he will, he can not satisfactorily escape the fact that he will die, end, along with the death of the body; which he treats by the way, as some necessary evil, a nuisance. So the very movement of thought in its continual search for security, freedom, etc., just continues the insecurity... because it created the insecurity in the first place.

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