Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
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The purpose of being

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Fri, 12 Jun 2009 #1
Thumb_stringio Mina Martini Finland 4 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

"The purpose of being."

It is felt how the question of 'purpose' as separate from Being, arises only in a dualistic mind, as an idea of 'purpose'. Without this illusion of separation between thinker and thought there is wholeness/holiness which cannot ask 'what is the purpose of this', because 'there is only This'.

Or in other words one could say the purpose is wholeness itself, life itself. Without time/thought there cannot be 'a purpose saved for the future' as separate from the action itself which is always timeless, always only now.

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Fri, 12 Jun 2009 #2
Thumb_original_avatar max greene United States 49 posts in this forum Offline

We ask, "What is the purpose in Being?" when we are looking for security or trying to reach a goal. We ask when we are not really living--we're busy with these motives.

max

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Tue, 16 Jun 2009 #3
Thumb_stringio Mina Martini Finland 4 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

max greene wrote:

We ask, "What is the purpose in Being?" when we are looking for security or trying to reach a goal. We ask when we are not really living--we're busy with these motives.


Yes, clear what you say. "Purpose" as an idea, the way it is being discussed here, is seen as an invention of thought to maintain/excuse itself, 'for this or that purpose', for 'the purpose of ending itself' for example! (such an ultimately distorted idea of purpose might appear in forums like this).

Yes, a question of purpose in this limited sense arises only when we are not really living. If we are, if we give all our attention to the present, thought/past/me naturally ceases and there is only silent attention. Time ceases. There is nowhere to go or nothing to become psychologically, no motive.

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Tue, 30 Jun 2009 #4
Thumb_img_7089_copy Eve G. Indonesia 11 posts in this forum Offline

Dear Mina,
I see what you mean. The question itself is resistance to what is. But don't you think that sometimes we question as a natural sense of curiosity or exploration without a goal? Or do you think that it is alwyas suffering that brings about this question?

The nature of the change from disorder is silence.

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Tue, 28 Jul 2009 #5
Thumb_stringio Mina Martini Finland 4 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Eve Goodmon wrote:

Dear Mina,
I see what you mean. The question itself is resistance to what is. But don't you think that sometimes we question as a natural sense of curiosity or exploration without a goal? Or do you think that it is alwyas suffering that brings about this question?


Dear Eve,

Excuse my not having replied before but 'the right moment' had not yet come. :-)

There is definitely curiosity, explioration without a goal. The only thing one has to do is to be with small enquiring children in whom there is no sense of thinker separate from thought yet, only the living curiosity towards all phenomena of life. It is only when this division takes place in the mind that all that comes from that division, including questions, come from suffering.

A good example of this was my 5-year-old daughter who discovered a book called "Why things are", last night. I read a few things for her, about why/how our hair becomes grey as we grow old...and immediately she snatched the book from me, saying: "Give it to me please, this is a very important book." :-)

When the questioner (thinker) has been seen as not existing, yes, i would say that questions of the sort that come from the questioner, from this division, end.

But there is then an alotgether different kind of enquiry, which is the whole one's life, as if one's whole being was silently wondering about itself. The One Being of all.


I saw you are a teacher. Very interesting. Which age group do you teach? Do you happen to work in a Krishnamurti-school?

I understood you yourself have attended a K-school when a child. Is that so?

There is more i would like to ask you about, but perhaps will leave it to another time, or perhaps write to you privately.

Kind regards,
Mina

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