Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
General Discussion | moderated by Dev Singh

Krishnamurti on Truth and Awareness


Displaying all 12 posts
Page 1 of 1
Fri, 28 May 2010 #1
Thumb_new_pics Toni Lorenzo United States 12 posts in this forum Offline

What is truth, according to you?’

‘Call it truth, liberation, or even God. It is all the same. Truth is for me the release of the mind from all burdens of memory.’ This definition was new to me, but before I could say a word Krishnamurti went on: ‘Truth is awareness, constant awareness of life within and without you. Do you follow?’ His voice became almost insistent.

‘I do, but please explain to me what you mean by “awareness”’, I replied.

Krishnamurti came even closer to me, and his voice became even more persuasive. ‘What matters is that we should live completely at every moment of our lives. That is the only real liberation. Truth is nothing abstract, it is neither philosophy, occultism nor mysticism. It is everyday life, it is perceiving the meaning and wisdom of life around us. The only life worth dealing with is our present life and every one of its moments. But to understand it we must liberate our mind from all memories, and allow it to appreciate spontaneously the present moment.’

‘I take it that by spontaneous appreciation you mean an appreciation dictated solely by the circumstances of that very moment?’

‘Exactly – there can be no other spontaneity of life; and that is precisely what I call real awareness. Do you understand?’

‘I do, but I doubt whether such awareness can really be expressed in words… I think it can only be understood if we actually experience it ourselves. No description can possibly do it justice.’

Krishnamurti did not answer immediately. He was lying on the ground, facing the sky. ‘It is so’, he said slowly; ‘but what is one to do?’

‘What indeed, Krishnaji? I wondered what you really meant when you told me yesterday that you tried to help people by talking to them. Can anyone who has not himself gone through that state of awareness of which you speak comprehend what it means? Those who possess it do not need to hear about it.’

Krishnamurti paused again, and I could hear that he was affected by the turn our conversation had taken. He said after a while: ‘And yet this is the only ay one can help people. I think that one clarifies people’s minds by discussing these things with them. Eventually they will perceive truth for themselves.’

I knew that Krishnamurti disliked all questions that seemed to arise out of mere curiosity or to depend upon abstract speculation, but I nevertheless asked him: ‘Don’t you think that the limits of time and space must cease to exist once we establish within ourselves a constant awareness of life?’

‘Of course they must. The past is only a result of memories. It is dead stuff. Once we cease to carry about with us this ballast there will be no time limits with regard to the past. The same is true in a slightly different way with regard to the future. But all this talk about seeing into the future or the past is only a result of purely intellectual curiosity. At every lecture I give half a dozen people always ask me about their future and past incarnations. As though it mattered what they were or what they will be. All that is real is the present. Whether we can look into the to-morrow or across continents is meaningless from a spiritual point of view.’

Quote from Krishnamurti As I Knew Him
by S. Balasundaram

There is nothing so powerful as the truth, and nothing so strange. ? Daniel Webster (1782-1852)

Sign in to recommend
Back to Top
Fri, 28 May 2010 #2
Thumb_new_pics Toni Lorenzo United States 12 posts in this forum Offline

Toni Lorenzo wrote:
‘Truth is awareness, constant awareness of life within and without you.‘What matters is that we should live completely at every moment of our lives. That is the only real liberation. Truth is nothing abstract, it is neither philosophy, occultism nor mysticism. It is everyday life, it is perceiving the meaning and wisdom of life around us. The only life worth dealing with is our present life and every one of its moments. But to understand it we must liberate our mind from all memories, and allow it to appreciate spontaneously the present moment.’

One observation is that many people have achieved this constant awareness of being in the now and living in the moment. The issue here is how long and well the same can stayed centered in his awareness until the arrival of the divineness overshadows and desends upon them.

There is nothing so powerful as the truth, and nothing so strange. ? Daniel Webster (1782-1852)

Sign in to recommend
Back to Top
Fri, 28 May 2010 #3
Thumb_img001 Sudhir Sharma India 1989 posts in this forum Offline

Toni Lorenzo wrote:
One observation is that many people have achieved this constant awareness of being in the now and living in the moment.

This awareness of 'being in the now and living in the moment' is neither an achievement(it is a surrender) nor it is constant. It is a moment to moment affair. The self is not present in those moments and so, the question ' how long and well the same can stayed centered in his awareness until the arrival of the divineness overshadows and desends upon them.' is irrelevant and will never be asked by the individual who factually understands 'living in the moment'. Living in that manner is a Joy and reward in itself. Nothing more is asked for as nothing is lacking.

Regards

FLOW WITH LIFE!

Sign in to recommend
Back to Top
Mon, 31 May 2010 #4
Thumb_avatar David Walker United Kingdom 9 posts in this forum Offline

Please note that the opening quoted passage is not from the book 'Krishnamurti As I Knew Him' by S. Balasundaram, but from the chapter 'Krishnamurti in Carmel' from the book 'God is my Adventure' by Rom Landau (1935)

This post was last updated by David Walker Tue, 01 Jun 2010.

Sign in to recommend  This post has been recommended by 1 reader
Back to Top
Mon, 31 May 2010 #5
Thumb_stringio RICK LEIN United States 4436 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Toni Lorenzo wrote:
One observation is that many people have achieved this constant awareness of being in the now and living in the moment. The issue here is how long and well the same can stayed centered in his awareness until the arrival of the divineness overshadows and desends upon them.

Hi Toni,sorry,achievement is becoming, which requires time,and effort,and awareness is not constant.being timeless there is no issue with how long,or with stay in it,and other than waxing poetic,what does diviness overshadowing,or decending have to do with anything?

THE TRUTH SHALL SET YOU FREE

Sign in to recommend  This post has been recommended by 1 reader
Back to Top
Tue, 01 Jun 2010 #6
Thumb_man_question_mark dhirendra singh India 2984 posts in this forum Offline

Living in that manner is a Joy

Not joy only,also there is pain, hunger, all ailments of life, Only difference is that there is no centre. There is ending of division but not ending of all human issue, There is not my problem but there is problem...

...and reward in itself. Nothing more is asked for as nothing is lacking.

No, no, many thing are asked for making life more healthy more safe and more pleasurable. Ending of division is the moment for initiation true work for humanity

I don't know

Sign in to recommend
Back to Top
Tue, 01 Jun 2010 #7
Thumb_stringio RICK LEIN United States 4436 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

dhirendra singh wrote:
Ending of division is the moment for initiation true work for humanity

The first,and last step,excellent D,thank you!

THE TRUTH SHALL SET YOU FREE

Sign in to recommend  This post has been recommended by 1 reader
Back to Top
Tue, 01 Jun 2010 #8
Thumb_img001 Sudhir Sharma India 1989 posts in this forum Offline

dhirendra singh wrote:
Ending of division is the moment for initiation true work for humanity

This is true.

dhirendra singh wrote:
many thing are asked for making life more healthy more safe and more pleasurable.

No, not asked for because if 'asking' is going on, then one is back in to the disturbances of division. The action is going on to make life more healthy, safe and comfortable(not pleasurable as this is a mental activity) but stress of desire is out.

FLOW WITH LIFE!

Sign in to recommend
Back to Top
Wed, 02 Jun 2010 #9
Thumb_stringio nick carter United States 777 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

David Walker wrote:
Please note that the opening quoted passage is not from the book 'Krishnamurti As I Knew Him' by S. Balasundaram, but from the chapter 'Krishnamurti in Carmel' from the book 'God is my Adventure' by Rom Landau (1935)

Thanks for making this correction. What do we know about Rom Landau besides the fact that he was a member of the Oxford group? When did he interview K? What was his agenda?

Sign in to recommend
Back to Top
Fri, 04 Jun 2010 #10
Thumb_tampura ganesan balachandran India 2204 posts in this forum Offline

nick carter wrote:
What was his agenda?

if you dont mistake , it appears as the same agenda as you have on your daily dialogue with JK:)

gb

We are watching, not waiting, not expecting anything to happen but watching without end. JK

This post was last updated by ganesan balachandran Fri, 04 Jun 2010.

Sign in to recommend
Back to Top
Fri, 04 Jun 2010 #11
Thumb_avatar David Walker United Kingdom 9 posts in this forum Offline

nick carter wrote:
Thanks for making this correction. What do we know about Rom Landau besides the fact that he was a member of the Oxford group? When did he interview K? What was his agenda?

Rom Landau speaks a little about himself in the introduction to his book. You can read it here:

http://tinyurl.com/35rt3yk

You can read the two chapters on Krishnamurti in their entirety from the links given here:

http://norea.net/krishnamurti/index.htm

This post was last updated by David Walker Fri, 04 Jun 2010.

Sign in to recommend
Back to Top
Sun, 06 Jun 2010 #12
Thumb_new_pics Toni Lorenzo United States 12 posts in this forum Offline

Toni Lorenzo wrote:
I take it that by spontaneous appreciation you mean an appreciation dictated solely by the circumstances of that very moment‘ Exactly – there can be no other spontaneity of life; and that is precisely what I call real awareness. Do you understand?

Am I to understand that K was implying here that the only real awareness is if I should find myself in a room with several beautiful young girls that I should not fight against the desire to satisfy and enjoy myself with all of them at once?

On the other side of the coin, if I should find myself in room full of gay men should I insist on maintaing my sexual orintation, would this also infringe upon the circumstances of the moment or real awareness?

There is nothing so powerful as the truth, and nothing so strange. ? Daniel Webster (1782-1852)

Sign in to recommend
Back to Top
Displaying all 12 posts
Page 1 of 1
To quote a portion of this post in your reply, first select the text and then click this "Quote" link.

(N.B. Be sure to insert an empty line between the quoted text and your reply.)