Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening

Javier Gómez Rodríguez - Personal Profile


Javier Gómez Rodríguez
Javier Gómez Rodríguez
Netherlands
Birthday: January 10
Member since: Tue, 09 Jun 2009, 11:13am
Last visited 12 months ago

Member Statement

My joining you all is an extension of my lifelong interest in K's teachings. For me the latter stand as the pinnacle of wisdom in our time and their mirroring of our human condition holds the greatest potential for transformation. This challenge affects us all as human beings and it is worth undertaking together, for the teachings are not so much an abstract philosophy as a way of life, which is the way of relationship. It is this that interests me profoundly and I hope that there might be meaningful contacts with others in this fundamental and common quest.

Interests and Recommendations

Books

Blindness by José Saramago, The Great Transformation by Karen Armstrong, The Shock Doctrine by Naomi Klein

Movies

Stalker by AndreyTarkovsky, Wings of Desire by Wim Wenders, The Exterminating Angel by Luis Buñuel

Music

All records by Portuguese group Madredeus, Three Songs by Osvaldo Golijov

Other interests

Art & Architecture, Philosophy, Religious Writings, World Literature, Current Events

Interview Answers

If you had to sum up what Krishnamurti is all about in just a few words of your own, what would they be?

In my view, K's teachings are concerned with the self-understanding of consciousness as the key to the transformation of mankind from its traditional way of division and conflict to the flowering of wholeness in relationship. The teachings are concerned with bringing about a non-dualistic way of existence so that the habitual divisions between individual and society, thinker and thought, and thought and intelligence are dissolved. The wholeness they are concerned to bring about reaches past the integrity of man in his inward being and relationships to the sacred ground of creation itself. They are, therefore, essentially religious in nature.

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Do you think it advisable to introduce Krishnamurti to people you know? Have you ever done it and if yes, what are your experiences?

Yes, I do. K's teachings cover a vast expanse of living and their very truthfulness can contribute significantly to our own self-understanding and freedom. I have done it several times. In some instances it was not felt to be helpful or of interest while in others it was very appreciated. It varies according to the sensitivity, urgency and vested interests of the people concerned.

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How important do you consider group dialogue to be in understanding the more subtle points of Krishnamurti's message?

Dialogue is important as a field in which we can understand our own meanings and arrive at a sense of participatory consciousness through the sharing of its diverse contents. Dialogue is therefore potentially conducive to creating the atmosphere of communication that can contribute to the understanding of ever subtler dimensions of our own nature as human beings. The teachings are there as a mirror of the more superficial and deeper aspects of our human condition and dialogue is a very natural way of engaging with them in this inquiry into ourselves.

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Are there any aspects of Krishnamurti's teaching that you find implausible or difficult to accept?

Not really. There are aspects that may be somewhat difficult to implement, but the vast scope of the teachings, in their more outward and inner delvings, is eminently understandable. It all makes sense and the whole thing hangs beautifully together.

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Do you think Krishnamurti was exceptional, or is the transformation he spoke of universally accessible?

K may have been exceptional because, if we accept that he might have been selfless since birth, such a phenomenon is not at all common. But, at the same time, the transformation he spoke of is indeed universally accessible, because it is a matter of insight and insight is our universal human potential.

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How do you personally go about exploring the Krishnamurti's teachings (through personal study, dialogues, dvds)?

I do all that: personal study, dialogues, dvds, and I add a good deal of reflection on the different aspects that come up and that apply to my daily life. I write a good deal about the issues in my life in the light of the teachings. And then I also sit down on a regular basis for periods of silent observation. The teachings are about the whole and wholeness of life and that's the real object of the exploration.

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Do you think it is possible to make Krishnamurti more "practicable" than what he himself seems to have allowed for?

Well, what didn't he allow for? For him, as I understand it, the teachings were the most practical thing because they went to the heart of right action. 'Practical', as he himself knew, comes from 'praxis', which means action. But action as we know and practice it (sorry about the redundancy) is not 'practical' because it is not an adequate response to the challenges we face, particularly in the human sphere and in relationship generally. Our actions are modifications of what has been and they perpetuate the old problems in a different way. This repetition is not action but inaction. So what we need is an inaction of the action that is no action at all. That's the reason why K's teachings seem to be 'impractical', because they are negative in their approach. But this is clearly a misunderstanding of what they stand for. So, no, the teachings cannot be made more 'practicable'. However, there is a point here worth exploring, and that is that the teachings' apparent negation of action as we know it seem to have encouraged a kind of paralysis in those interested in the teachings. People seem to be afraid to act for fear of going wrong. This becomes its own self-defeating handicap. It is in this regard that I think we need to remove our own misunderstandings regarding our own freedom of action in the light of the teachings. I feel this would make us all far more daring and adventurous. We might then be more willing to explore avenues in which to make the teachings into a shared way of life through all manner of cooperative actions, such as might result in the creation of study centres, schools and whole communities of people who want to explore the whole and wholeness of life in the light of the teachings. I feel that such actions are an integral part of the practical nature of the teachings and of our freedom to become fully responsible for ourselves and the world at large.

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Can dialogue - in the sense of sincere inquiry - be organized or can it only come about spontaneously, unprompted?

Of course dialogue can be organized. That means a time, a place and even a format can be set up. What K & Bohm did in terms of dialogue was organized in this manner. The issue is not spontaneity versus organization; they are not opposites. The issue is seriousness and depth of concern re the abiding issues that face us daily in our existence. And not just as passing immediate challenges but as symptoms of a much deeper need for clarity and wholeness. This is what seems to be missing in the general approach, that we don't seem to stay with these issues and see them as intrinsically universal and as constants in the unfolding movement of consciousness in its search for meaning. When this urge is there then there is no question of a divide between organization and spontaneity. I'd venture to say that, on the contrary, organization then becomes an aid to the unfolding of consciousness, as otherwise it would be left to chance, to mood and opportunity. This is what generally is meant by 'spontaneity'. That word sounds good, signifying an absence of predetermination or premeditation, an action born of pure freedom, but in fact it's just as caught up in conditioned reactions as any organized situation, the reason being that the background of consciousness is still the same. Dialogue implies a commitment to in-depth self-inquiry at the collectively shared level of meaning and that cannot be left to chance encounters and 'spontaneity' of that kind since the issue is constant, universal and always with us-- in fact the issue is 'us'. So I'd say: 'Let's organize as many dialogues and dialogue groups as we can, because such an inquiry and format of communication is an absolute necessity in our time.'

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Do you ever feel that you have been conditioned by Krishnamurti's teachings?

No, I don't. The teachings do introduce a language, a logic, a way of thinking and of looking at things, but they deny their own importance as preconditions for the actual act of seeing. The conditioning is not in the teachings but already existing in the structure of consciousness as we know it. The teachings are pointing to this structure and that pointing is invariably liberating because it is truthful. So no, I don't feel I've been conditioned by K's teachings.

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Has coming into contact with Krishnamurti and his teachings had any perceptible effect on your life and/or relationships?

Yes, it has, but; I must admit, not at the depth I was expecting. For one thing, the contact with K and his teachings has broadened my perspective of the human condition and given clear pointers to the source of its endemic malaise, not to say pathology. That diagnosis is quite clear to me and that helps with the understanding of myself and others in relationship. That is an operative aspect of understanding that has had and continues to have significant effects. However, there are very subtle aspects that need greater delving into, and in this regard I'd mention the exploration, per se, of thought as such. It is here where all such effects or defects are to be found.

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Does the phrase "living the teachings" have any meaning to you?

It does, actually, but I'd have to qualify my answer. On the face of it the phrase sounds like a good old recipe for imitation along traditional religious lines, something like the imitation of Christ that Christians recommended to themselves as the way to salvation. That is evidently not what is meant. So what is meant by 'living the teachings' if it's not following and conducting one's life according to them? Can the teachings be followed? If they can't, then what could it mean to say that they are to be lived? Well, exactly that the teachings are a way of life and not a theoretical approach to living. To live the teachings means that living and the teachings are one and the same, not two separate things in search of an eternally elusive approximation. And that living begins and ends with the quality of undivided observation. Then just as there are not teacher and disciple, there are no living and teachings, for they flow in the wholeness of learning. That is what 'living the teachings' means to me.

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What future do you foresee for Krishnamurti's works? Do you think they will grow in importance or will they just gradually die away?

I'm afraid that my prophetic powers are not all that great. Nonetheless, let me venture a guess or, better still, two, since there is doubt every way I look. I start from the sense of the undeniable importance of K's works as the purest reflection of the truth in our time. I see as well that our time is not very receptive to such truth. And, I might venture to add, perhaps no time can ever be, for truth is timeless. Metaphysical conundrums aside, the future of K's works or teachings depends on the depth of engagement that we living human beings bring to bear on them, i.e. on the constant issues or fundamental questions of our lives. If we keep going in the survivalist mode of our current civilization then K's works will become mere relics of a beautiful but ineffective mystical tradition. Pragmatism cannot view them otherwise. But if by some miracle of perception mankind generally should begin to see the deeper cracks in its grandiose edifice, in its consciousness, then the teachings might indeed grow in importance as the most relevant mirror of that intrinsic crisis of the human condition. The most realistic answer probably lies somewhere in between these two seeming extremes, namely in K's works being of critical importance in deepening the quality of self-knowledge and insight in a serious few who then may in turn provide the foundations for a regeneration of culture and of society generally. After all, the fundamental questions the teachings address will not go away no matter how good we get at escaping via our improved gadgets. And as long as they remain, so will the teachings. And even if the teachings were entirely forgotten, their essence will still be alive because they are about the actuality of living, which we cannot escape.

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How do you strike a balance between healthy doubt and ready acceptance in investigating Krishnamurti's proposals?

The question would seem to imply that doubt involves a negative disposition, and that is not necessarily the case. Doubt does mean skepticism, but the latter just means, etymologically, to look about, consider, observe. It is related to 'scope', which in the original Greek meant a mark for shooting at, therefore a purpose or desired aim. Skepticism of course meant that there could be no complete knowledge of anything and, therefore, that it must fall always short of its aim. Here is where doubt has its proper place and why the leash is still important. The leash is necessary to keep it from throwing the baby out with the bath water, i.e. to throw out knowledge because of its incompleteness. Doubt finds its place and its freedom at the limit of knowledge and in discovering that very limit, for it is also in the nature of knowledge to overextend itself into areas where it does not belong. Here is where doubt is essential and it is not negative, since its fundamental aim is to expose deception and uncover the truth. There is then no tying oneself up in knots nor falling into blind belief. It is rather a question of finding the balance between the necessary known and the indispensable unknowing.

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Recent Activity

Wednesday, 24 December, 2014

5 Comments

Herman Ivo wrote:
Tue, 29 Nov 2011, 9:24pm

Dear Javier,

My name is Herman Ivo. I read that if it is possible, you want to start a K school in the Netherlands. can you inform me about this plan.

I look forward to hearing from you.

Herman Ivo
tolivo@zonnet.nl

Wed, 27 Feb 2013, 1:32am

Hi Ivo,

I am afraid that I am no longer involved with the creation of a K school in NL. However, it may very well be that this project is still on. If so, the person to contact is Mr Peter Jonkers, Secretary, Stichting Krishnamurti Nederland. I hope he will be able to inform you better about this project.

All the best,
Javier

judith donson (account deleted) wrote:
Mon, 08 Jul 2013, 2:54am

HI,
Please can we be friends?
My name is Judith,i am a simple girl,I'm interested in you for a good friendship,please contact me back for a better introduction if you're interested.feel free as i will be waiting to hear from you soon (judith.donson22@yahoo.com)

Yours friend Judith.

judith donson (account deleted) wrote:
Mon, 08 Jul 2013, 2:54am

HI,
Please can we be friends?
My name is Judith,i am a simple girl,I'm interested in you for a good friendship,please contact me back for a better introduction if you're interested.feel free as i will be waiting to hear from you soon (judith.donson22@yahoo.com)

Yours friend Judith.

Sat, 27 Dec 2014, 3:41pm

Hola javier, soy tu amigo Baldomero. Como puedo communicate contigo.