Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
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Is vegetarianism a must for saving the world and ourselves?

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Thu, 10 Sep 2009 #61
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Patricia Hemingway wrote:
Really Bob - one cannot even begin to approach the teaching of K until all vestige of such petty-minded judeo-christian conditioning is seen, understood and ended. No wonder you dismiss the later teaching, where K had finally closed all loop-holes for those who would still seek self-gratifying solace in what he said.

Thanks for sharing your views on the matter, Patricia. I sit content with mine and have nothing further to add here.

Love and best wishes,

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Thu, 10 Sep 2009.

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Fri, 11 Sep 2009 #62
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

LOS ANGELES ? Gertrude Baines, who lived to be the world's oldest person on a steady diet of crispy bacon, fried chicken and ice cream, died Friday at a nursing home. She was 115.

Baines, who remarked last year that she enjoyed life so much she wouldn't mind living another 100 years, died in her sleep, said Emma Camanag, administrator at Western Convalescent Hospital.

The centenarian likely suffered a heart attack, said her longtime physician, Dr. Charles Witt. An autopsy was scheduled to determine the cause of death.

"I saw her two days ago, and she was just doing fine," Witt told The Associated Press. "She was in excellent shape. She was mentally alert. She smiled frequently."

Today's Yahoo News.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090911/ap_on_re_us...

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Fri, 11 Sep 2009.

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Fri, 11 Sep 2009 #63
Thumb_9204480_n03 French Touch France 9 posts in this forum Offline

What's your view on workout session or intense physical exercise?

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Fri, 11 Sep 2009 #64
Thumb_original_avatar max greene United States 23 posts in this forum Offline

Bob,

My God, and she lived in Smog City to boot! She must have had lungs like a blacksmith's bellows. What a wonderful tribute to her physique and her eating habits.

So?

max

This post was last updated by max greene Fri, 11 Sep 2009.

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Sat, 12 Sep 2009 #65
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Super Califra wrote:
What's your view on workout session or intense physical exercise?

Personally, though I no longer work, I'm very active and walk between 4 and 6 or sometimes more miles a day. Which is about as intense as it gets for me, though I feel I'm very energetic and far from being a couch potato. I'm not a vegetarian but try to eat what I feel is a proper diet. Though I slip into eating junk food on occasion, though not without being aware of it and sometimes getting on my case about it. About 85% of my posting here is done from about 4 or 5 different libraries throughout the day whereby I often proof read what I write and meditate on it while walking and bussing between them. I take no medications whatsoever. Nor do I consume any mood altering substances including coffee. Though once I was a very heavy drinker, smoker, and sugar and coffee hound and also an overeater. I certainly don't claim to be the fittest of physical specimens, but I feel good and quite alive, alert, and full of energy nearly all the time.

My view on intense physical workout? I think one's mental, spiritual, and moral health and well-being should come first. And from there our body's own natural intelligence will dictate what is best for us individually in all areas of our lives.

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Sat, 12 Sep 2009.

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Sat, 12 Sep 2009 #66
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

max greene wrote:
My God, and she lived in Smog City to boot! She must have had lungs like a blacksmith's bellows. What a wonderful tribute to her physique and her eating habits.

Hi Max,

I read in another obituary on her that she said she never smoked, drank, or fooled around. And while I was once guilty of doing all these things, at mid-life I began to do a turn-around in these areas. Which has me believing and feeling that my slate's been wiped pretty clean here again. Though I don't think I'll see the hundred mark. Interestingly, I find, that Ms. Baines outlived K, the squeaky-clean veggie eater and answer man, by some 25 years. And died much more peacefully and painlessly than he did.

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Sat, 12 Sep 2009.

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Sat, 12 Sep 2009 #67
Thumb_original_avatar max greene United States 23 posts in this forum Offline

Bob,

Thanks for your reply.

Yes, one man does everything right and he dies early and another man lives a wastrel's life and he dies late. But if we want to bet on one or the other. . .

What puzzles me is that men in organized crime seem to have such long lives--that is, if they don't get whacked while on the job. I've noticed this fact, reading about these men in the papers from time to time. It just doesn't seem right.

max

This post was last updated by max greene Sat, 12 Sep 2009.

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Sun, 13 Sep 2009 #68
Thumb_february_26-_birthday_pics_and_ebay_001 Greg Van Tongeren United States 28 posts in this forum Offline

The division between meat-eaters and vegetarians is not 'inward division'. It is a physical fact. We are what we eat - no?

gv: One kind of diet may well be factually more healthy than another but thought invents a self-image around it and compares that image with that of others.

The benediction is where you are

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Sun, 13 Sep 2009 #69
Thumb_9204480_n03 French Touch France 9 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
My view on intense physical workout? I think one's mental, spiritual, and moral health and well-being should come first. And from there our body's own natural intelligence will dictate what is best for us individually in all areas of our lives.

Bob M.

What come first...

Sorry I decided to change my name for the one I have on the other board. Super Califra -> French Touch

Nice to see you Bob!

Like you, I've been roughly through everything. Overeating, drinking, smoking. Depression. All things nobody today can think I've done. I am very lean. I ran 6 miles this morning (I'm younger than you, and I am working, so I don't have time to walk 6 miles). I've been rowing, swimming, and biking yesterday. I eat Organic food (but I have no problem to eat in a Mc Donald's a few times in the year). Green tea for me. I'm not perfect as I have this bad habit to take ambien to sleep. I'll get rid of this at one point.

People think too much (about not thinking here). As it's all about sensibility (or sensitivity? I always have problems with this words in English), they should exercise more (or dancing), to keep their body alert.

This post was last updated by French Touch Sun, 13 Sep 2009.

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Mon, 14 Sep 2009 #70
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

max greene wrote:
Yes, one man does everything right and he dies early and another man lives a wastrel's life and he dies late. But if we want to bet on one or the other. . .
What puzzles me is that men in organized crime seem to have such long lives--that is, if they don't get whacked while on the job. I've noticed this fact, reading about these men in the papers from time to time. It just doesn't seem right.

Hi Max,

I don't think K did everything right. And I think you would agree that a long life is not necessarily a quality life. The Preacher of Ecclesiastes fame was also puzzled by the notion you bring up here: Pondering why the just and the righteous often shorten their days in their righteousness while the wicked often prolong there days in their wickedness. And then concludes that one should not be overly righteous or wise nor overly wicked or foolish so as not to die before one's time.

I think organismal sensitivity, or the lacking thereof, plays a big hand in this phenomenon. Seems those who are insensitive, cold, and callous or lacking in having a sound conscience often live a long, carefree, prosperous, considerably self-centered, and destructive life and even sleep quite well at night. Whereas those who have a finely-formed conscience often suffer deeply and even fatally over life's many vicissitudes and injustices.

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

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Mon, 14 Sep 2009 #71
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

French Touch wrote:
Nice to see you Bob!
Like you, I've been roughly through everything. Overeating, drinking, smoking. Depression. All things nobody today can think I've done. I am very lean. I ran 6 miles this morning (I'm younger than you, and I am working, so I don't have time to walk 6 miles). I've been rowing, swimming, and biking yesterday. I eat Organic food (but I have no problem to eat in a Mc Donald's a few times in the year). Green tea for me. I'm not perfect as I have this bad habit to take ambien to sleep. I'll get rid of this at one point.
People think too much (about not thinking here). As it's all about sensibility (or sensitivity? I always have problems with this words in English), they should exercise more (or dancing), to keep their body alert.

Hi French Touch,

I remember you now from the KFA discussion forum where I was shown the door by the management before we could ever really get to rap. Anyway, I think perhaps if one abuses his body for a time, as I did considerably, it can actually make it stronger or tougher. That is if one stops abusing it in time. The human body seems to have marvelous healing powers. Again if we stop doing what's wrecking it before it's too late. I'm really no one to tell anyone in any sort of authoritarian manner what to do, but rather I try to focus on telling others what I have done, what I have discovered. Though having found that rare state of freedom that K had found there comes with it a tremendous amount of enthusiasm which sometimes tends to try to push others into taking that blind leap of faith into the unknown, which must be done if one is to also discover that joyful freedom of the soul, the human spirit. I was on occasion on various prescribed psychiatric drugs including Valium. Though again I'm free of all medications presently and would hope to go to the end of my days that way. I've come to realize that I don't want to ever mask or numb any pain or uncomfortability in my organism with any drugs or mood-altering substances, but rather try discover their roots and then make the necessary adjustments or changes to overcome them. I often tell others that I was born drug and medication free and hope to die that way. Though of course there's certainly no guarantees here.

Yes indeed, it's surely about sensitivity or sensibility as you say FT, and thinking, questioning, investigating, and discovering things for oneself, which K insisted on too. And maintaining or recultivating that sensitivity especially, since life tends to tie especially highly-sensitive people up in many, many knots along with stripping us of our innate free-spiritedness. Which happens slowly, subtly, and gradually over time and most often without us even being at all aware of it. Likewise we also get caught up in thinking our way through life rather than feeling our way through it. Certainly finding a balance between thinking and feeling is the ideal, the goal, however presently man everywhere lives largely out of his head or via self-protective and analytical thought rather than out of his heart or his intuitive mechanism. And it's this (the IM) I find in my own journey is what I had to redevelop. Learning again how to intuitively (and thereby maturely) handle life's many various living situations that used to baffle me, and without the help of any crutches such as alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, or prescribed drugs. I never used any street drugs.

So surely it's important to excercise (keep the body "alert", in tune, and thereby keenly responsive) and watch what we put into our bodies, though again I feel that our emotional and spiritual heath and for certain our mental attitude are very important too. I too surely know first hand what depression is. I was nearly always full of hope and enthusiasm for life in my younger days (inspite of being half-aware that there was something terribly wrong with the world and its people), though as life and time went on and bad decisions were made as the result of my best (under the influence) thinking along with becoming more and more aware that there was something definitely wrong with the entire human species), there came a time (age 36) when all hope, optimism, and enthusiasm for life were gone and suicide seemed the best solution to what became a totally empty meaningless existence. From this 'bottom' eventually came a radical rebirth experience (one of many) along with a totally brand new outlook on life. Which was the beginning of many changes (some of them major ones) in my life along with being engaged in an awakened and conscientious process of self-discovery or self-realization. As a result I now feel, without any doubt whatsoever or any need to boast (but just to enthusiastically share the possibility or the potential with others), that I am to a fairly good degree a light both unto myself and to others, just as K tried so hard to encourage us to be. Which looking back through my life I can say that I always was, but in a very fragmented and limited manner. Which, along with many yet unconquered defects of character, fear, and ignorance made me really no light at all. And the reason my life was void of genuine heartfelt joy and enthusiasm. Which is no longer the case.

I'm curious FT as to whether you possess the traits of workaholism and perfectionism? I have and now consider them assets since it seems quite clear to me that balance, wholeness, or centeredness will only be found by those who tend to energetically and even wrecklessly go to extremes. Whereas the half-hearted, the mediocre, and the sloppy very seldom, if ever, seem to make it to the Promised Land. Seems clear to me that evolution is best served and advanced by men and women of real ACTION, rather than those who are content to be mere wordsmiths, observers, analysts, theorists, or judges of others, and that she rewards us accordingly.

Indeed, as it's been said, variety (change, new experiences, new faces etc.) is the spice of life. Nearly every friday I stop at a McDonalds and enjoy a small fruit and yogart parfait, and once in a while I'll enjoy a fatburger there too.

Enjoy your days FT, "it's later than you think!"

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Mon, 14 Sep 2009.

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Mon, 14 Sep 2009 #72
Thumb_deleted_user_med xyz XYZ Egypt 12 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Dear Robert M.

<pre> Boy, you sure have gone out of your way to defend your right to that peace of meat in your plate. I understand you have been through a lot, you are a survivor and as such you are not the kind of person I would try to persuade to give up meat. You are an example of what I was saying to Krish. Persuasion is a waste of time. The decision to become a vegetarian has to come from within. I personally disapprove of vegetarians going around making meat eaters feel bad about themselves. But I enjoy debating, so I would like to bring to your attention that vegetarianism has little to do with health, or with living longer or dying peacefully...it's not about you. You seem to concentrate on that yummy chicken bone or whatever that's in your plate and you dismiss the whole process of how that meat ended up in your plate and sorry to tell you this but you know, it's ugly all the way. That chicken bone you are gnawing at, has come from a chicken that has not lived a very healthy life, it has not lived as long as it could have and it didn't die peacefully neither. So all I am saying as a vegetarian is that what I want for myself ie. health, long life,etc. I also want for other living creatures, for you and for hogs and chicken and fish, etc. Best regards, my good fellow.
</pre>

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Mon, 14 Sep 2009 #73
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

pollixenie dritsas wrote:
Persuasion is a waste of time. The decision to become a vegetarian has to come from within. I personally disapprove of vegetarians going around making meat eaters feel bad about themselves. But I enjoy debating, so I

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Mon, 14 Sep 2009 #74
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Dear Pollixenie Dristas,
I agree, I am not here to compel anyone to become vegetarian.I accept them as they are, people.But in the larger context of animals suffering and perishing at automated factories(grown&killed) and pollution on Earth spreading, incurable diseases breaking out(chiken-Guniya, Swineflu etc),Water and land resources destroyed, corn that can be consumed by humans(who are poor&starving)are fed to these factory-reared animals.... endless mismanagement and gross insensitivity-- that goes on needs to be pointed out. That is all.

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Mon, 14 Sep 2009 #75
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

pollixenie dritsas wrote:
Boy, you sure have gone out of your way to defend your right to that peace of meat in your plate.

Hi Pollixenie,

"Out of my way"??? I totally disagree. I'm defending nothing nor trying to persuade anyone on how to eat, live, etc. And I think anyone with a truly open mind can readily see that.

My posts here go far, far beyond vegetarianism vs. meat eating. Nor do I care at all what anyone does in this area of life. When someone is spirtually dead to life (which the vast majority of people are, and most without even knowing it) it really matters little what he or she eats or don't eat.

My primary concern, here and everywhere in life, is to point the way to others in hopes of setting a few of them "absolutely, unconditionally free", as per K, and doing whatever it takes to be successful in this adventure, which K surely wasn't by his very own admission.

Nor am I really concerned with debating, since most of the time it's little more than subtle self or ego assertion and thereby very largely spiritually unfruitful. Nor do I have any need for cheerleaders or supporters.

Live and let live - live and let die!

Best of mountain climbing to you and yours,

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Mon, 14 Sep 2009.

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Mon, 14 Sep 2009 #76
Thumb_deleted_user_med xyz XYZ Egypt 12 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Dear Robert: Yeah, yeah...whatever you say, Robert

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Mon, 14 Sep 2009 #77
Thumb_deleted_user_med xyz XYZ Egypt 12 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Dear Krish: I understand you and I appreciate what you are doing. I was only trying to get our friend Robert to be less uptight about the whole thing...well at least I tried.

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Mon, 14 Sep 2009 #78
Thumb_9204480_n03 French Touch France 9 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
Though having found that rare state of freedom that K had found there comes with it a tremendous amount of enthusiasm which sometimes tends to try to push others into taking that blind leap of faith into the unknown, which must be done if one is to also discover that joyful freedom of the soul, the human spirit.

I wish I did not try to push others into taking that leap. It has been such a waste of time and energy for me.

Robert Michael wrote:
I'm curious FT as to whether you possess the traits of workaholism and perfectionism? I have and now consider them assets since it seems quite clear to me that balance, wholeness, or centeredness will only be found by those who tend to energetically and even wrecklessly go to extremes. Whereas the half-hearted, the mediocre, and the sloppy very seldom, if ever, seem to make it to the Promised Land. Seems clear to me that evolution is best served and advanced by men and women of real ACTION, rather than those who are content to be mere wordsmiths, observers, analysts, theorists, or judges of others, and that she rewards us accordingly.

Yes I am. One way or the other you always need to make an effort to live, so better doing me with passion for what you love than getting some rest among boring people, who very often have the secret desire to keep you as mediocre as they are.

Life is like exposure in photography. You have to capture the overall tonal range.

This post was last updated by French Touch Mon, 14 Sep 2009.

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Tue, 15 Sep 2009 #79
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

French Touch wrote:
I wish I did not try to push others into taking that leap. It has been such a waste of time and energy for me.

Hi FT,

I see nothing wrong with pushing others, evolution demands this from those who are awakened. However when push turns to shove, that is when the problems occur.

Might I suggest you fully take off the rose-colored glasses and look fearlessly and courageously into the terribly fallen (and "violent" - K) condition of the herd of humanity that's all around you? It just may prompt you to fully flee the pack and go into some spititually productive solitude for a time.

http://bernie.cncfamily.com/k_search1.htm

Happy trails,

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

This post was last updated by Robert Michael (account deleted) Tue, 15 Sep 2009.

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Tue, 15 Sep 2009 #80
Thumb_9204480_n03 French Touch France 9 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
Might I suggest you fully take off the rose-colored glasses and look fearlessly and courageously into the terribly fallen (and "violent" - K) condition of the herd of humanity that's all around you? It just may prompt you to fully flee the pack and go into some spititually productive solitude for a time.
Hi Bob,

Is there anything that make you think I did not do that already?

Krishnamurti:
Ever since I was young I have observed these things, and I have never allowed myself to be caught up in any of these confusions. Because I have established my goal, because I have always regarded myself as a boat on the stream, having no connection with the land where there is confusion, I have attained, and now I would share my experience with others. I would help those who are confused to make their minds and hearts simple in their desire for attainment.

You will hardly find anybody interested if you have not already a platform.

But I can relate to this one :

Krishnamurti:
It does not matter whether you accept or reject it. When a flower opens and gives its scent, it does not heed if the passer-by does not delight in its fragrance.

And this one :

Krishnamurti:
I have painted my picture on the canvas and I want you to examine it critically, not blindly. I want you to create because of that picture a new picture for yourself. I want you to fall in love with the picture, not with the painter, to fall in love with the Truth and not with him who brings the Truth. Fall in love with yourself and then you will fall in love with everyone.

And this one. lol ; )

Krishnamurti:
I set out to find for myself the purpose of life and I found it without the authority of another. I have entered that sea of liberation and happiness in which there is no limitation or negation because it is the fulfilment of life.
Because after my long journey towards attainment and perfection I have attained that perfection and established it in my heart, and because my mind is tranquil and eternally liberated at the flame, I would give of that understanding to all.

This post was last updated by French Touch Tue, 15 Sep 2009.

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Thu, 17 Sep 2009 #81
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

French Touch wrote:
Is there anything that makes you think I did not do that already?

Hi FT,

Have you fully fled the pack (the living dead)? Fully overcome the world and its ways of self? Do you reside on that Other Shore? Or are you merely a better rat in the rat race?

"For the total development of the human being, solitude as a means of cultivating sensitivity becomes a necessity. One has to know what it is to be alone, what it is to meditate, what it is to die; and the implications of solitude, of meditation, of death, can be known only by seeking them out. These implications cannot be taught; they must be learnt. One can indicate, but learning by what is indicated is not the experiencing of solitude or meditation. To experience what is solitude and what is meditation, one must be in a state of inquiry; only a mind that is in a state of inquiry is capable of learning. But when inquiry is suppressed by previous knowledge, or by the authority and experience of another, then learning becomes mere imitation, and imitation causes a human being to repeat what is learnt without experiencing it." (J. K.)

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

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Thu, 17 Sep 2009 #82
Thumb_9204480_n03 French Touch France 9 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
Have you fully fled the pack (the living dead)? Fully overcome the world and its ways of self? Do you reside on that Other Shore? Or are you merely a better rat in the rat race?

I have. I do. I am not.

There is no surprise for me in the worst or the best man. I am them all.

But I am still delighted at/for the better and most talented ones!! : )

This post was last updated by French Touch Thu, 17 Sep 2009.

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Thu, 17 Sep 2009 #83
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

French Touch wrote:
There is no surprise for me in the worst or the best man. I am them all.
But I am still delighted at/for the better and most talented ones!! : )

I am too!!! : )

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

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Fri, 18 Sep 2009 #84
Thumb_9204480_n03 French Touch France 9 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
French Touch wrote:
There is no surprise for me in the worst or the best man. I am them all. But I am still delighted at/for the better and most talented ones!! : )
I am too!!! : )

Bob M.

One of this guys!
http://www.dailymotion.com/video/xa0toa_wheneye...

This post was last updated by French Touch Fri, 18 Sep 2009.

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Sat, 19 Sep 2009 #85
Thumb_9204480_n03 French Touch France 9 posts in this forum Offline

Or this guy http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z19zFlPah-o
"You won't want to see the beauty of starting anew, you don't want risk for the very simple reason that when you take the risk there will be danger." J. Krishnamurti

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Sat, 19 Sep 2009 #86
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

French Touch wrote:
"You won't want to see the beauty of starting anew, you don't want risk for the very simple reason that when you take the risk there will be danger." (J. Krishnamurti)

I think the old boy had a considerably risk-free life. A life of security and ease. Which largely helped render him completely ineffective in "setting men absolutely, unconditionally free."

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

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Sat, 19 Sep 2009 #87
Thumb_9204480_n03 French Touch France 9 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
I think the old boy had a considerably risk-free life. A life of security and ease. Which largely helped render him completely ineffective in "setting men absolutely, unconditionally free."

Bob M.

But you also think than being protected made him what he was?

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Sun, 20 Sep 2009 #88
Thumb_deleted_user_med Robert Michael United States 116 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

French Touch wrote:
But you also think that being protected made him what he was.

Do you mean being protected in childhood, or his feeling of being protected throughout his whole life, FT?

In any case, I'm thoroughly convinced that the circumstances of his early formative years is what made him what he was. Including his chronic illnesses which afforded him an extraordinary close bond to his mother and considerable (quiet) time away from school. Of course his mother also considered him a special child from the time of his birth (due to Hindu tradition - him being the 8th child), which too had a large bearing in developing his finely-formed and extraordinarily sensitive brain and body.

Bob M.

"Very soon a man shall appear who will finally dispell the universal darkness from our world." (Bob M.)

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Sun, 20 Sep 2009 #89
Thumb_9204480_n03 French Touch France 9 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
Do you mean being protected in childhood, or his feeling of being protected throughout his whole life, FT?

I think life is different if you have to find a job and nobody care about you or think you are "different". I was as smart as I am now when I was 17, but apparently I had to go through hell several times before now.

His intelligence was never denied. It helps.

This post was last updated by French Touch Sun, 20 Sep 2009.

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Mon, 21 Sep 2009 #90
Thumb_photo Prasanna P India 33 posts in this forum Offline

Robert Michael wrote:
In any case, I'm thoroughly convinced that the circumstances of his early formative years .......... Including his chronic illnesses which afforded him an extraordinary close bond to his mother and considerable (quiet) time away from school. Of course his mother also considered him a special child from the time of his birth (due to Hindu tradition - him being the 8th child), which too had a large bearing in developing his finely-formed and extraordinarily sensitive brain and body.
Bob M.>

The serious debate forum was closed abruptly and let us hope, this one doesn't close soon. K can be called a 'self-made' man, after all those TS experiments on him. Only difference being that, he knew his goal was nothing short of absolute freedom. I don't consider his brain and body were any better than most children born in a lower middle class family in India. There were innumerable families with dozen or more children. Only when the functioning of intelligence in him returned to normal, he became an extra ordinary human being, since others continued to be short of normal.

Unless Advanced, K's Teachings May Remain As Ineffective As of Now

This post was last updated by Prasanna P Mon, 21 Sep 2009.

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