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Cleaning corruption in Politics by Satyagraha

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Thu, 06 Aug 2009 #1
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Todays news from India.One local party in South India boycotts elections because of the electronic voting machines are fraudulent. Meanwhile, a group called "Satyagraha "headed by educated unemployed youth go around falling prostrate before the feet of individuals in the public places and requesting them to exercise their vote with conscience, not to be pressured by money, bribes, caste, religion or other parochial considerations.Mr.Ramkakrishna sastri is the head of this movement attempting to appeal for the corruption-free-politics among the voters.He says, corruption at election leads to corrupt politics.So he wants to eradicate corruption at election itself.As Jk reader/student, it appears as right action to me.Seeing the root of the problem, this group is geared into action.I hope they awaken the conscience of many millions of voters in India.

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Thu, 06 Aug 2009 #2
Thumb_avatar Paul Lanzon United Kingdom 24 posts in this forum Offline

hello Krishnan,

It seems that corruption in politics is endemic. The Brits have (until recently) usually felt their politicians were reasonably free from corruption, which shows how naive they have been. Firstly, there are apparently no politicians who are sensitive or spiritually aware; and they are all badly educated. Not having associated with wise or aware people, compassionate or rational, they know only those of the same ignorant class as themselves, educated in institutions that promulgate ignorance and disseminate lies and hypocracy. First of all they learn the glib tongue, in which they all excel, and practise how they can convince the populace that black is actually white. But they, of course, are often trained as lawyers which should be reason enough not to trust them.

But all this is rooted in a fundamentally corruptible society. Anyone who is bereft of compassion or wisdom must create problems in the world; that is inevitable. Of course there will sometimes be exceptions to this bleak picture, but they are soon snuffed out by the sheer weight of the opposition. Why, after so many centuries do people still put their trust in this appalling gang of shysters?

Paul

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Fri, 07 Aug 2009 #3
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Lanzon wrote:
Anyone who is bereft of compassion or wisdom must create problems in the world; that is inevitable. Of course there will sometimes be exceptions to this bleak picture, but they are soon snuffed out by the sheer weight of the opposition. Why, after so many

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Fri, 07 Aug 2009 #4
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Dear Paul Lanzon, thanks for your kind observations. These young persons in India, stun the ordinary uneducated villagers, by falling prostrate, on their feet. The Indian tradition is this act conveys respect and reverence. At the sametime they request the onlooker to be honest when he or she votes. (whenever someone fell prostrating as a mark of respect before him, JK was annoyed and he used to begin to fall on the other persons feet-this is showing respect to elders,wisemen,gurus-this is Indian tradition.)
If by this simple act, they could convey sincerely to the voter to be clear and vote conscientiously, they have achieved something. They have already covered many states, villages etc-the news says.The ordinary voter who votes for money, food, gifts etc is puzzled. This is india. Anything goes in India.You have nicely described what goes on in UK. We all know what goes on in the USA through media-hype.Here in Denmark where I live, corruption is not so high but mental brain-washing is there. As you mentioned, glib-talkers get away with it.Everyone pretends to be the champion of WELFARE.The beauty is welfare has become the biggest problem with economic downturn and spiralling taxes.
In another topic, I raised the question of "organisations per se are not the answers to human problems" especially with reference to this WELFARE question. I read your profile and I happy to follow you on this forum.
Regards,
Krishnan

Life is like the tamarind fruit bound in its shell

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Fri, 07 Aug 2009 #5
Thumb_avatar Paul Lanzon United Kingdom 24 posts in this forum Offline

Hi Krishnan, You say anything goes in India; I suppose you could say in some sense that it is both a good and a bad thing. But then India has been a kind of fountainhead for so much of the world. I must say I lament the virtual demise of Buddhism in India - not that I think it would have provided a miraculous cure for human corruptibility - but I think it would have brought about a saner way of living. We know that Asoka's reign brought stability to the country. K, as usual, was right to emphasize the vital importance of right education. I can see no other way of creating a well-balanced society. But with the world population as it is, where are the right kind of teachers to come from? Yet the only thing that keeps despair at bay is the feeling that in this world anything may be possible - especially when there is a will, or many wills. Best wishes, Paul.

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Fri, 07 Aug 2009 #6
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Lanzon wrote:
We know that Asoka's reign brought stability to the country. K, as usual, was right to emphasize the vital importance of right education. I can see no other way of creating a well-balanced society. But with the world population as it is, where are the right kind of teachers to come from? Yet the only thing that keeps despair at bay is the feeling that in this world anything may be possible - especially when there is a will, or many wills. Be

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Fri, 07 Aug 2009 #7
Thumb_readytoloadup_correction Krishnan Srinivasan Denmark 322 posts in this forum Offline

Dear Paul, thanks for your comments. Asoka was a man who learnt from his own deeds, as we all progress in our age, all of us have an "inner Asoka" telling us. That is discernment, constant re-evaluation, dawning of INTELLIGENCE in our lives.By the time we realize that, we are about to depart from this earth. So, as you mentioned, we have to catch them young. May be, it would be a good idea JK readers start talking to youngsters on common human issues and problems.
On Buddhisms decline, no worry," Isms" sprout, grow and wither away as always in India.As long as the chaos of India allows the growth of ideas,actions, this would continue.
If I were to completely listen to SRI RAMAN MAHARSHI, who am I to tell others what to do? According to him , like Asoka ,we have already killed the dwelling GOD in us by taking up the thoughtprocesses that leads to the for,mation of "I"/Ego So the GOD cannot represnt his TRUE HAPPY SELF. We mask him with our own "SELVES".
In that connection I understand who am I to teach the other?Who am I to prevent another from Killing/war/violence?
With warm regards,
Krishnan.

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Tue, 11 Aug 2009 #8
Thumb_deleted_user_med Dappling Light India 31 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

When you stop eating(as also in satyagraha), you withhold the habit of absorbing, the false. Psychological eating or not eating is more important than fasting fakely with juices and fruits.

There is a certain beauty associated with conditioning.

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Tue, 11 Aug 2009 #9
Thumb_avatar Paul Lanzon United Kingdom 24 posts in this forum Offline

Hello, Krishnan, I hope you don't mind if I stick up for Buddhism. I mean the real thing, without the ism. You cannot justly call this teaching another ism like the rest. K himself regretted the fact that India chose to ignore, for example, Nagarjuna, (there are several others he could also have named). Of course, there will always be the majority who never see into the whole depth and beauty of the Dharma, that includes most of those who like to call themselves buddhists, and almost all of the so-called scholars.
Yes, it's true what you say; you can't teach others until the 'monster' has been tamed and put in his proper place, instead of assuming he is the centre of the universe. But even this unruly beast will prove surprisingly useful when he's finally accepted he has no substance and is truly a nonentity. Thank you krishnan; my little brain has come to a halt.

best wishes

Paul

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