Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
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Human consciousness in its state of duality is a ghost..


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Sun, 14 Jan 2018 #1
Thumb_img-0590 Mina Martini Finland 221 posts in this forum Offline

Had initially written this in another thread, but feel it is good to start a new one with it.

We could say that the psychological consciousness is a ghost in the sense that it can never be actual and is maintained by the self as desire. This consciousness is a desire to continue, instead of fully dying/living. Because of its incomplete and delusive nature, its desires can never come true, it will 'never get there' (because there is really nowhere to go, no one to go anywhere) and it goes on trying to fullfill the desires, in vain. It is creating its own reality of pain and pleasure, of contradictions, which is based on the denial to live/be with what is real and wanting to exchange it for an idea of life, the idea of oneself being the top priority, instead. It can never rest, never BE, because the only way it can exist is through the idea of becoming, everlastingly. Even if it thought it will find peace when it reaches its imaginary goals in an imaginary future or gets what it desires, this will never happen, because it can only keep on becoming and accumulating more and more of itself to itself...

The price to pay lies in the experience of separation, isolation, sorrow, which is inevitable if one goes against the real nature of life and of oneself. This is the psychological movement, the ghost.

Taking it for what is true, turns one into a zombie, a walking dead.

But seeing it for what it is, is liberation from all imaginary ghost-like boundaries!

This post was last updated by Mina Martini Sun, 14 Jan 2018.

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Mon, 15 Jan 2018 #2
Thumb_img-0590 Mina Martini Finland 221 posts in this forum Offline

Such an angelic girl she was!

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