Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
A Quiet Space | moderated by Clive Elwell

suggestions for a passage from K


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Sun, 29 Oct 2017 #1
Thumb_kinfonet_avatar Clive Elwell New Zealand 3818 posts in this forum Offline

Does anyone have any suggestion for a passage from K (preferably on video, or audio) concerned with how to approach his talks? I mean “how to” (not a method) to listen, and perhaps the importance of watching the movement of one's own mind when watching a talk? That sort of thing, to be used as an introduction, before watching a talk at a K gathering.

Just a short passage would do

Thanks

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Mon, 30 Oct 2017 #2
Thumb_profiel Wim Opdam Belgium 590 posts in this forum Offline

Dear Clive,

I wonder why you are asking for a suggestion from K.?

There are countless comments from him about, for example,
the art of listening or the state of the ability to understand,
but what do we do with it in our daily lives ??

There was a time when we encountered a silence for a meeting,
because of the presence of a lot of small talk, but in time it became a custom.

Also for a while, we have taken a quote of K., which was then read twice,
before watching a video and afterwards a dialogue.

It turns out that if one make arrangements it will not work.

Nowadays we start with an open question from a day-to-day situation.
A beautiful example of that is Juans's position in a rough environment,
how do you act in that ?

Truth will unfold itself for those who enquire their own actions and only to them and for them and to or for no one else.

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Mon, 30 Oct 2017 #3
Thumb_profiel Wim Opdam Belgium 590 posts in this forum Offline

For those who prefer K. speaking on the subject:

Benares, India | Fifth Public Talk, February 20, 1949

Questioner: You say the mind, memory and the thought process,
have to cease before there can be understanding, and yet you are communicating to us.
Is what you say the experience of something in the past,
or are you experiencing as you communicate?

Krishnamurti: ... It is essential to have a still mind, a quiet mind, in order to understand,
which is fairly obvious to those who have experimented with all this. The more you are interested in something, the more your intention to understand, the more simple, clear, free the mind is. Then verbalization ceases. After all, thought is word, and it is the word that interferes. It is the screen of words, which is memory, that intervenes between the challenge and the response. It is the word that is responding to the challenge, which we call intellection. So, the mind that is chattering, that is verbalizing, cannot understand truth - truth in relationship, not an abstract truth. There is no abstract truth. But truth is very subtle. It is the subtlety that is difficult to follow. It is not abstract. It comes so swiftly, so darkly, it cannot be held by the mind. Like a thief in the night, it comes darkly, not when you are prepared to receive it. Your reception is merely an invitation of greed. So, a mind that is caught in the net of words cannot understand truth.

The next question is: Is it not possible to communicate as one is experiencing?
For communication there must be factual memory.
As I am talking to you, I use words which you and I understand. Memory is a result of the cultivation of the faculty of learning, of storing words. The questioner wants to know how to have a mind that does not merely express or communicate after the event, after the experience, but a mind that is experiencing and at the same time communicating.
That is, a new mind, a fresh mind, a mind that is experiencing without the interference of memory, the memory of the past. So, first let us see the difficulty in this.

Truth will unfold itself for those who enquire their own actions and only to them and for them and to or for no one else.

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