Krishnamurti & the Art of Awakening
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Observations


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Tue, 28 Jun 2011 #1
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

We took my grand-daughter to a presentation of Prokofiev's Peter And The Wolf last week. Cuara just had her third birthday. She sat on my lap and was intensely connected with the music and ballet. Her body shook with fear each time the wolf appeared and she held my hand tight.

Afterwards, Ana, asked her if she had understood the story a lot or a little. Cuara thought about this and answered, "I understood it a lot and a little."

It is fascinating to me that a child of thirty-six months can already look into herself and make such an observation, which was both accurate and authentic, whilst defying the normally accepted conventions of comparative language to explain things more clearly and concisely than an adult ever could.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

This post was last updated by Paul Davidson (account deleted) Wed, 06 Jul 2011.

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Wed, 29 Jun 2011 #2
Thumb_tampura ganesan balachandran India 2204 posts in this forum Offline

For the waves of truth, the refreshing foods, have always clung to the well born child for reward. Wearing a cloak, the two world halves made him grow on butter and food and honey.
gb

We are watching, not waiting, not expecting anything to happen but watching without end. JK

This post was last updated by ganesan balachandran Wed, 29 Jun 2011.

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Thu, 30 Jun 2011 #3
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Walking in a street in Sao Paulo I came across a man walking his dog, which was a boxer. I say 'walking' but in fact the dog walked upon its fore-legs only. The back half of its body was suspended in a wheeled contraption that allowed the dog to proceed on two legs and two wheels. I suspect it was disabled from birth and wondered what would have become of such a creature in the wild.

And I also marveled at the inventiveness of thought which had figured out a way, not only to feed, house and protect the animal but to also allow it to exercise and to take part in life as a whole. Surely thought, keenly connected with the true emotion of compassion, is a natural blessing for humankind and not its damnation.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Fri, 01 Jul 2011 #4
Thumb_tampura ganesan balachandran India 2204 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Davidson wrote:
Surely thought, keenly connected with the true emotion of compassion, is a natural blessing for humankind and not its damnation

They are
born of the Truth; they are luminous leaders of the mind; they
shall drink the sweet wine of delight and give us the supreme
inspirations.

We are watching, not waiting, not expecting anything to happen but watching without end. JK

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Tue, 05 Jul 2011 #5
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

We were walking past a small open-fronted shop whose shelves were loaded out with a confusion of shoes in all states of repair. The old cobbler stood at the front looking down absently at the feet of the passers-by.

One wondered what were his thoughts, how he arranged his view of the world, how limited or expansive his perception of life might have been, how his meanings were determined for him, with what function he measured his fellow beings and with what filter he decided between right and wrong.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Tue, 05 Jul 2011 #6
Thumb_tampura ganesan balachandran India 2204 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Davidson wrote:
The old cobbler stood at the front looking down absently at the feet of the passers-by.

Our thoughts bring us to diverse callings, setting people apart; the carpenter seeks what is broken, the physician a fracture, with his dried twigs, with feathers of large birds, and with stones, the smith seeks all his days a man with gold and the priest seeks one who presses Soma.
O drop of Soma , flow for Indra..
gb

We are watching, not waiting, not expecting anything to happen but watching without end. JK

This post was last updated by ganesan balachandran Tue, 05 Jul 2011.

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Tue, 05 Jul 2011 #7
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

ganesan balachandran wrote:
Our thoughts bring us to diverse callings, setting people apart; the carpenter seeks what is broken, the physician a fracture, with his dried twigs, with feathers of large birds, and with stones, the smith seeks all his days a man with gold and the priest seeks one who presses Soma.

It is true Dhirendra. I remember one summer 35 year's ago when I stopped overnight in a small country hotel in Cornwall (south-west England). The landlady wanted to know what I wished for breakfast and asked, "Are you an egg person?" I had never suspected that the human family could be sub-divided in such ways.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Wed, 06 Jul 2011 #8
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

We were walking in the hills, the mountains. The national park was far away and there the hills were untouched with forests abounding. It was mid-winter here in the tropics and the sun was still hot. We met a young man with a horse. He complained that the road was coming nearer and that his life was changing. He could make good money as a guide and he offered to sell us part of his property. He wanted to separate from his greedy sisters who longed to live in the town.

The hills rolled on before us that afternoon. They had their own sense of time. It was a wave. It was happening now but we were moving too fast to see it and the wave was frozen before us and so we called the wave 'hills,' as if there were fixed for all time.

Later we went to visit another property. We walked up a lane lined with pine trees. It was a temple and one could feel the sacred energy, even though those trees had the touch of man's hand upon them. Still, it was a place cleansed of any corruption and we both felt it so strong it took your breath away and stopped the heart.

Rounding a corner we came upon a Buddhist shrine. There in the heart of the mountains of central Brazil was a centre run by a Tibetan monk and his American wife. If we were to buy the land we came to see the temple would be our neighbor. We visited that other property and walked in the hills above the farm. It was a good place to build. Maybe we will return to do so.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Tue, 12 Jul 2011 #9
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

It was a long journey. To sit in an airplane seat for almost twelve ours is an unnatural constraint on one's body and one's spirit.

A seemingly young woman was beside me. She had very decorative nails and was apparently reading a German magazine. After the usual airplane food she fell asleep immediately. As she slept I noticed a very powerful energy around her which I found quite soothing. Despite a somewhat flamboyant nail-polish she seemed someone very much at peace with herself and the world.

I could not sleep, nor read. I viewed two films, the last of which, Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf' interested me enormously. Shot in 1966 in black and white, the film starred Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. I recalled that at the time it had won prizes. The story was set in a claustrophobic mid-western university and dealt with relationship games, the 'love-hate' nexus, death. hope and dispair. In the forty-five years of its life the movie had lost none of its vigour or relevence as a life-changing experience.

Later, she woke and we began to talk. She was not German but Estonian. She was a doctor, a paediatrician and had been working in a mountain respite near the capital, Brazilia, with children affected by the nuclear disaster of Chernovil back in the mid-eighties. Now she was treating the children of the children, many with complicated medical histories, chronic anaemia and so on.

I noticed that as she read her book she passed her hand over the page and I questioned her about it. She talked freely and told me that she had discovered by accident that she had healing powers and had been developing them with some guidance from others. She was on her way home for a week to help with the birth of her first grandchild.

As it turned out I had been checking-in on-line at the same time she had booked her flight. I had chosen my seat from the many available. It is good to think that some seemingly trivial choices can end in unexpectedly interesting results.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Wed, 13 Jul 2011 #10
Thumb_avatar Ravi Seth India 1573 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Davidson wrote:
It is good to think that some seemingly trivial choices can end in unexpectedly interesting results.

.......the trivial choice of Paul Davidson was to write his travelogue and it ended in matching, tone by tone to 'k's notebook!

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Wed, 13 Jul 2011 #11
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

The blackbird and the rabbit hardly move as one walks down the path. The rabbit is still quite small as it is only summer and he has hardly lived out one season. As one approaches he may twitch an ear or alter the pace of his eating (he is nibbling the grass). And in this way one can get quite close but one must keep on walking. Sometimes the rabbit is lass than a metre from one's feet but if one stops the rabbit pauses. He does not look round but he knows you have stops. He starts to eat once more. All is still well. But if you then look at him with attention his whole mood changes. He scampers away and hides beneath the bush.

The blackbird, too, is interested in you. She sings as you pass, even less than a metre away. When you stop, she stops. And if you stare she hops away or takes to the wing, creating a suitable distance. It seems to be an instinctive response.

The small animals are very alert yet they do not seem to mind my presence. But if I fix them in my gaze they take flight. I must not show any interest. Why should I be interested? If I regarded them as prey I would be interested. They know this. Only the predator pays any attention. Otherwise, they are lost in their activities, not quite lost. Only the human loses himself.

And we are lost in our dreams when someone points something out. Then we are shocked into what we call self-awareness. But self-awareness is not yet wakefulness. Only the small animal is fully awake.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Thu, 14 Jul 2011 #12
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Today I received a letter from the pension fund telling me I was entitled to a one-off, lump-sum payment of £10,000.

Today I received a letter from my solicitor telling me that to extend the lease on my apartment will cost £10,000.

Moral: It is good to have friends in both high and low places.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

This post was last updated by Paul Davidson (account deleted) Thu, 14 Jul 2011.

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Fri, 15 Jul 2011 #13
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

I move home today. I have been here too long and will return to London. I have been sick the past days. The body does not like all this change. It has to be whipped.

Have you noticed how quick the body is in its reactions yet how slow it is in its adaptations? Still, where would we be without it?

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Wed, 20 Jul 2011 #14
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Walking again down London streets. I am noticing many things, the way people walk, the way they talk. And I hear my own internal dialogue, so critical. All the time judging everybody. There is so much that is truly ugly on the city street. Yet this habit of comparison and judgement stifles compassion. Not that I should try to feel compassionate. One cannot be compassionate as an act of will. But I do feel the lack of compassion in my inner voice and I know that this harsh critic that I have adopted is not me. And it is only when I identify with that voice, either positively or negatively, that it brings me into conflict. I think there must be a way to simply let it be, let it come and go until it withers on the vine. There is a deep compassion within me but it is hardly heard while this voice is given recognition. And when that compassion is there, even the ugly is beautiful.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

This post was last updated by Paul Davidson (account deleted) Wed, 20 Jul 2011.

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Fri, 22 Jul 2011 #15
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Dive into life and what may you find? A moon shining like a pearl, a scented rose of tiger balm, an ocean as deep as night, two blackbirds on a summer morning, the blessed pain of birth, a stony mountain path, the sublime beauty of one dissonant note.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Sat, 23 Jul 2011 #16
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

There can be struggle only between two false things, conflict between the environment and the result of environment which is the "I".

Krishnamurti Quote of the Day | Jul 23, 2011

+++++++++

I wonder if this is seen clearly. Do I see that in my everyday struggles it is only the environment which is at odds with its own results? A long as I do not see this and in so far as I do not see it, I am no more than the environment which has acted through me to cause an effect.

Then, it hardly matters which way it is put:

Either the effect is trying to change its own cause:

or

The cause is trying to become a different effect.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Mon, 25 Jul 2011 #17
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

I read a phrase in Gurdjieff's 'Tales of Beelzebub' this afternoon which went something like, "It is like wrangling with pigs over the fragrance of oranges" and I laughed for it reminded me of some of the wrangling going on right here.

Obviously there is a conflict involved between two false things, as in the K quote above. So, why blame the pig for the disagreement. Understanding may be species-specific.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

This post was last updated by Paul Davidson (account deleted) Mon, 25 Jul 2011.

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Tue, 26 Jul 2011 #18
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

I see that this morning I have been caught in the 'wranglings with pigs over the nature of oranges' mentioned above. But I wonder where the moderators are on this site. Have they all died and gone up to heaven? If so, this is a clear dereliction of duty. Who gave permission for such individualistic behavior?

In the meantime I shall try to keep my wranglings to the minimum. Like the man giving up smoking, bit by bit, over time, I may become entirely free of them!

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

This post was last updated by Paul Davidson (account deleted) Tue, 26 Jul 2011.

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Sat, 06 Aug 2011 #19
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

This afternoon I went into town to see the film "Pina" about a German choreographer of modern dance. The film was a tribute to her, as she has passed on, and consisted in excerpts, pieces and interviews. It was extraordinary beautiful and I do recommend it.

I was able to witness the power of dance, when animated by love, as a means to unlock the emotional life of a human. She advised one young male dancer who was a little stuck, "Dance for love." THe film was made in that spirit.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Mon, 08 Aug 2011 #20
Thumb_tampura ganesan balachandran India 2204 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Davidson wrote:
In the meantime I shall try to keep my wranglings to the minimum. Like the man giving up smoking, bit by bit, over time, I may become entirely free of them!

So wranglings continue...
gb

We are watching, not waiting, not expecting anything to happen but watching without end. JK

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Mon, 08 Aug 2011 #21
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

ganesan balachandran wrote:
So wranglings continue...

. . . as there is no 'I' that can stop them.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Mon, 08 Aug 2011 #22
Thumb_avatar Ravi Seth India 1573 posts in this forum Offline

Paul Davidson wrote:
. . . as there is no 'I' that can stop them.

LOL

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Mon, 08 Aug 2011 #23
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Ravi Seth wrote:
LOL

Not that there is no 'I' but that this 'I' cannot stop its own wranglings as it is itself a wrangle.

This phenomenum is well understood by physicists as being a particular expression of Newton's first law of motion, otherwise called the 'law of inertia', whereforth:

"Every body persists in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by force impressed"

A cricket ball flying towards the line cannot decide, midair to stop itself (unless batted by the Indian national team - I believe).

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Tue, 09 Aug 2011 #24
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Rioting in the streets of London.

And on the television, a riot of opinion.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Tue, 09 Aug 2011 #25
Thumb_deleted_user_med Muad dhib Ireland 175 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

My daughter living near Portobello said a black man was killed by the police ,father of 4 kids ,then the riots started !

who owns TV ? the elites , well some of them ! See where my finger is pointing ?....including dear Rupert Murdoch who is publishing this book !!

The Book : On Relationship -by Jiddu Krishnamurti.

The Publisher......is Harper Collins.

The Owner....

Rupert Murdoch. A main figure of The dictators in world news!

Truly the Lord works in mysterious ways. I took it from ken on artofinquiry.

Yes mysterious ways !!:)

Dan.....

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Tue, 09 Aug 2011 #26
Thumb_deleted_user_med Muad dhib Ireland 175 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

here is the link!

Dan.....

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Tue, 09 Aug 2011 #27
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

Muad dheeb wrote:
a black man was killed by the police ,father of 4 kids ,then the riots started

You see! Opinions start with categorizations such as, 'the police.' Who are 'the police' who killed this 'black man?' Were they not human beings? Human beings killed other human beings and then burned down the town. Look at who we actually are and not stick with the names we give ourselves.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Sun, 14 Aug 2011 #28
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

They had stopped in the street and were looking at a billboard advertisement. There was a siamese cat and a dog.

The grandmother was asking the small child, a girl of five, "What's unusual about the cat, Amy, can't you see?"

The child felt awkward. She was having to perform. She could see a cat.

"Can't you see what's unusual, Amy? The cat's got blue eyes, hasn't it. That's unusual."

The girl looked relieved. The ordeal was over. An answer had been given.

I restrained my desire to say to the grandmother, "It is not unusual to the cat."

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Mon, 22 Aug 2011 #29
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

He was slumped in his seat as I took my place at the neighbouring table; a young Asian man, probably of Pakistani heritage and about thirty years of age. At first sight he looked ill, but then it seemed more probable that he was waiting, waiting to continue his story, waiting for someone to return so that he could begin again.

It was a Vietnamese restaurant in East London, a weekday evening. As I sat and began to read, the woman returned. From their conversation I imagined it may have been a blind date, a first encounter; the young man seemed keen to outline his life story to her, but she appeared rather older than he and I realized she was the mother.

She was concerned to listen, but her concern was a mother's care for her child, even though he was far past childhood. I would catch the occasional words as I turned the pages and awaited my meal. Several times I heard the man introduce the phrase, "my life,' as in "It's my life" and "This is my life." The mother was patient and conciliatory, to the extreme, even when he made her refrain from her comment in order that he, the son, could finish his thought. Again and again, "My life."

Probably, from the few words I caught, he was complaining bitterly at his fate to be married to a woman who was not pandering to his every whim. His mother advised, "Focus on your home life." And why indeed, since he was absent, should not the wife take up her own interests. The mother's concern was to impart good family values to her son. The son was so wrapped up in his own story that to him thw whole world was merely a representation of 'his life.'

I wanted the mother to be angry with him, to say, "You selfish little shit, it is not your life or my life or his or her life, it is life."

But he would have not heard her and she would not say it. I wanted her to speak from her heart, not from her sentiment, but what was it to me?

And he, what was it about him, this childish attitude, this lack of growing up. And I knew that it was all about his relationship with his father, his competition with the older man, his demand for automatic respect. He had never been allowed to be the child he truly was, whether to be an artist or to shit his pants.

His life had been contained and his story was that of the world. One measuring himself against the other. Immersed in the story of his own miserable existence. The mother too, resembled him. After all, he was her production too.

I felt the whole restaurant as a ship moving through space. We pass through the world and the world passes through us. All that differs is the relative tempo of the motion. The unreality was very real.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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Wed, 24 Aug 2011 #30
Thumb_stringio Paul Davidson United Kingdom 3659 posts in this forum ACCOUNT DELETED

I was travelling home in the car listening to the radio. It was a US professor who had worked for the CIA for 20 years and was now heading an institute that studied political personalities. He had been brought in to discuss Col. Gaddafi.

This unbiased voice of authority said it was clear Gaddafi was borderline insane (he did not specify which particular type of insanity) and that two things triggered his insane moments. One was when he was winning and the other was when he was losing.

If this analysis was not impressive enough in itself, the professor went even further. He said the insanity was shown when Gaddafi was winning, by his state of euphoria, and when he was losing, by his state of denial.

So, looks like we have six billion crazy people out there.

"The ego is first and foremost a body ego." S. Freud

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